May: Month 9 GSM

1. In completing Cycle 1 of my Capstone project I used a mixture of qualitative and quantitative data. For my qualitative data I used pre and post surveys, student interviews, observational notes, and a KWL chart. For the quantitative data I used pre and post assessments, a skit project with rubric for grading, and few small lab assignments from Explore Learning.

2.  My pre surveys for both Cycle 1 and Cycle 2 found that the students did not find science interesting. They stated their favorite part of science were the labs and gave no clear area of enjoyment. In the post surveys nearly all students enjoyed science because of the projects and stated that their favorited area was Physics, Newton’s Laws of Motion, or Energy. In the pre assessments the average grade was a 33% and in the post assessments the average grade was an 80% where 19 out of 24 received an 80% or better in Cycle 1 and 11 out of 17 of the students received an 80 or better out of 100 in Cycle 2. For the skit assignments only 4 out of the 24 students received less than an 80% with their grade being no less than a 70%. In the Cycle 2 roller coaster project 16 out of the 22 students received 100 points out of a total of 100 possible. The other 6 were either absent or did not turn the project in. Overall in Cycle 1 students seemed to enjoy working on the skit project and finding ways to present Newton’s Laws of Motion. The students found Schoology convenient, however it was hard for them to remember that this tool was available to them. Few of them accessed Schoology from home as seen in student interviews.  Students seemed to complete more work when the entire class was in the computer lab as opposed to when we were using laptops in the classroom as seen in my observational notes. In contrast, the Cycle 2 participants worked better when we worked on the laptops in the classroom as opposed to being in the computer lab as seen in student interviews. The Cycle 2 participants completed more of the activities than the Cycle 1 participants as seen in the submitted assignments in Schoology. The Cycle 2 participants also enjoyed the roller coaster project as seen in their grades and completed projects. Interviews in both Cycles showed that the students enjoyed the peer work, hands-on learning, and ability to have the notes readily available for review.

3. I believe GSM will contribute to my Capstone or classroom by giving me different ways to help facilitate the learning of my students. GSM will help me learn the benefits of virtual games and how they can enhance student engagement, participation, and collaboration in the classroom. Students are using games on a regular basis so if I have the tools to utilize that in Physics education or other areas of science the students will have that much more interest in the content being taught. This knowledge will also provide the student an opportunity to show what they know in unique and possibly more comfortable ways.

1 thought on “May: Month 9 GSM

  1. Hello Angela, my name is Jason Capobianco and I am new to your class this month. Great job with your blog post! Even though I am new to the class and reading through your research for the first time, I am thoroughly impressed at your detail, and feel that I have a really good understanding of your research focus, implementation strategy, and your results. It seems like your first implementation cycle was very strong and impacted your students in a positive way, both from an educational and emotional standpoint. Congratulations!

    Have you had the opportunity to read our coursebook written by James Paul Gee? I could not help but think about his writings specific to physics and the incorporation of gaming into learning, as I read through your research implementation. It seems like there are many similarities to the approach you have taken with some of your labs and groups projects. Interesting coincidence. Have his writings sparked any new ideas for how you might move forward with your implementation and / or future research?

    Anyway, great job!

    Jason

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